Poll: Utahns Say Tighter Gun Laws Won’t Prevent Terrorist Attacks

Barack Obama 03Even though President Barack Obama is using executive actions to tighten restrictions on gun sales, most Utahns don’t think that will prevent future terrorist attacks like what happened in San Bernadino, California.

 
A new UtahPolicy.com survey conducted by Dan Jones and Associates finds 81% of Utahns say stronger gun laws will either “definitely” or probably” not prevent future terrorist attacks. That includes 60% who say “definitely not.”
 
 

 
On December 2, 2015, Syed Rizwan Farook and Tashfeen Malik, a married couple, opened fire on a holiday party at the Inland Regional Center in San Bernadino, California. Fourteen people were killed in the attack and 22 were injured. The couple reportedly began plotting a terror attack before they were engaged and had pledged their allegiance to terrorist organizations via social media. They were both killed in a shootout with police.
 
On Wednesday, President Barack Obama announced new executive orders to tighten up some gun laws, including expanding background checks for gun sales over the internet and at gun shows. A previous UtahPolicy.com survey found that a solid majority of Utahns support such expanded background checks for gun sales.
 
 

 
The only group in our survey that thinks tighter laws might prevent future attacks is Utah Democrats. 50% of that group say restrictions will either “definitely” or “probably” reduce attacks. However another 50% say new restrictions will not have an effect.
 
On the other hand, Republicans and independents agree that tougher gun regulations won’t prevent future terrorist attacks. A whopping 93% of Republicans and 76% of independents think that.
 
 

 
There’s no gender gap on the question either as both men and women are not of the mind that tighter regulations will lead to fewer terrorist attacks. 79% of women and 83% of men feel that way.
 
The survey was conducted by Dan Jones & Associates from December 8-14, 2015 among 622 adult Utahns. It has a margin of error of +/- 3.93%.