Briefing National

  • The Senate will again try to pass their tax package on Friday. The process hit a snag on Thursday after deficit hawks raised concerns that the plan would blow a $1 trillion hole in the budget [Washington Post].

  • If Republicans can pass the proposed massive tax cuts, it could trigger massive spending cuts in federal programs, including Medicare [Politico].

  • President Donald Trump repeatedly pressured top Republicans over the summer to end the Senate probe into Russian interference in the 2016 election [New York Times].

  • Russian trolls pushed offensive and racist content to Americans via Twitter during the 2016 election. Some of the posts accused Democrats of satanic practices and supporting rape [NBC News].

  • President Donald Trump reportedly is telling close confidants that a government shut down would be good for him politically [Washington Post].

  • The State Department warned the White House about possible protests and violence at US embassies after President Donald Trump retweeted some anti-Muslim videos this week [CNN].

  • The White House is reportedly working on a plan to oust Rex Tillerson as Secretary of State. He will reportedly be replaced by current CIA Director Mike Pompeo [New York Times].

  • The Trump administration is considering allowing former US intelligence officers to run privatized covert actions, including intelligence gathering and the rendition of suspected terrorists [BuzzFeed].

  • Congress secretly paid nearly $100,000 to settle sexual harassment claims from two male staffers against former Congressman Eric Massa [ABC News].

  • Sen. Al Franken is facing increasing pressure to resign after multiple women have come forward to accuse him of groping them [Washington Post].

  • President Donald Trump complained Friday morning that the immigration history of a Mexican man who was acquitted in the murder of a San Francisco woman was not presented to a jury. Trump often highlighted the case while on the campaign trail in 2016 as part of his rhetoric against illegal immigration [Politico].

  • A female candidate for Attorney General in Michigan raises the issue of sexual harassment in a campaign ad. She vows she won't show her penis to staffers because she doesn't have one [Detroit Free Press].

  • Robots could replace a third of the American workforce by 2030 [Washington Post].

On this day in history:

  • 1824 - Since no candidate won a majority of the votes in the electoral college during the presidential election, the US House of Representatives is given the task of deciding the winner. John Q. Adams was declared the winner in February of 1825.

  • 1903 - The world's first drive-in gasoline station opened in Pittsburgh.

  • 1913 - Ford Motor Company introduces the first moving assembly line.

  • 1917 - Rev. Edward Flanagan founded Boys Town near Omaha.

  • 1955 - In Montgomery, Alabama Rosa Parks refuses to give up her bus seat to a white man and is arrested for violating the city's racial segregation laws.

  • 1969 - The first draft lottery in the United States is held since World War II.
  • The Senate GOP votes to begin floor debate on their tax reform measure with an eye toward passing the package by Friday [The Hill].

  • A new analysis of the current Senate GOP tax plan shows nearly 40% of Americans will not get a significant tax cut [Washington Post].

  • President Trump's director of legislative affairs says a government shutdown in December is not likely [ABC News].

  • President Donald Trump sparked international outrage by re-tweeting a series of anti-Muslim video clips posted initially by a far-right fringe group in Britain [Washington Post].

  • London's mayor, who is a Muslim, is urging Prime Minister Theresa May to cancel Trump's state visit to the U.K. following Trump's retweets of a British far-right extremist group [Associated Press].

  • White House adviser Jared Kushner reportedly met this month with investigators for special counsel Robert Mueller's probe into Russian meddling in the 2016 election [New York Times].

  • It's looking more and more like special counsel Robert Mueller has cut a deal with President Trump's former national security adviser Michael Flynn [CNN].

  • President Donald Trump is feeling more cocksure than ever, reveling in stirring the pot then skating away from the controversies without any consequences [Washington Post].

  • The woman who attempted to infiltrate the Washington Post to plant a false story about Alabama Republican Senate candidate Roy Moore was trying to get inside the paper for months [Washington Post].

  • Alabama Republican Roy Moore has regained the lead in the polls ahead of the December special election. He briefly fell behind Democrat Doug Jones following allegations he pursued relationships with teenagers when he was in his 30's [FiveThirtyEight].

  • The U.S. warns North Korea that their leadership will be "utterly destroyed" in the case a war breaks out [Reuters].

  • The current debate over sexual harassment has the potential to disrupt the 2018 midterm elections [Reuters]. 

  • Boring but important: The Senate GOP campaign arm broke into a fundraising database maintained by House Republicans [Politico].

  • Multiple women have accused former NBC anchor Matt Lauer of inappropriate sexual behavior. None of these allegations are related to the reason Lauer was fired by NBC on Wednesday morning [Variety].

  • Economist Joseph Stiglitz says bitcoin should be banned because it's not controlled by any government. He also sees a bubble surrounding the rapid rise in value for the cryptocurrency [Coindesk].

On this day in history:

  • 1782 - Treaty of Paris: Representatives from the United States and Great Britain sign preliminary peace articles to end the American Revolutionary War.

  • 1803 - Spanish representatives officially transfer the Louisiana Territory to a French representative. Just 20 days later, France transfers the same land to the United States as the Louisiana Purchase.
  • President Donald Trump is tweeting about the NFL again Tuesday morning:

    • 5:46 am (MST) - "At least 24 players kneeling this weekend at NFL stadiums that are now having a very hard time filling up. The American public is fed up with the disrespect the NFL is paying to our Country, our Flag and our National Anthem. Weak and out of control!"

  • Republicans in the Senate are scrambling to find votes for their tax reform plan. The effort to win GOP votes is resulting in more provisions that benefit wealthy Americans finding their way into the package [New York Times].

  • Former national security adviser Michael Flynn met with members of special counsel Robert Mueller's team on Monday, raising the specter that he is trying to cut a deal with prosecutors [ABC News].

  • This is an astonishing story. A woman approached the Washington Post claiming to be a victim of Alabama Republican Roy Moore. In doing their due diligence, the paper discovered she was actually part of a right-wing sting operation to discredit the media, then confronted her about it [Washington Post].

  • Evan McMullin redux? A retired marine colonel in Alabama is launching a write-in campaign for next month's U.S. Senate election. Lee Busby's last-minute candidacy certainly has the potential to siphon votes away from controversial Republican Roy Moore [Washington Post].

  • President Donald Trump broke out his favorite racial slur for Democratic Sen. Elizabeth Warren, calling her "Pocahontas," at an event honoring Native American veterans. It did not go over well [Time].

  • There's a bizarre situation unfolding at the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. Two people, each claiming to be the acting director of the agency, showed up on Monday [New York Times].

  • Yet another woman says longtime Democratic Rep. John Conyers made unwanted sexual advances toward her [Detroit News].

  • Sen. Al Franken apologizes for groping several women, saying he would work to regain the trust of voters [New York Times].

  • The White House is weighing a ban on personal phones for employees. The official explanation is personal devices pose a cybersecurity threat, but some wonder if it's an effort to cut down on leaks [Bloomberg].

  • Maliz Beams, who was hired to help Secretary of State Rex Tillerson overhaul the State Department, has quit after just three months on the job [BuzzFeed].

  • Ivanka Trump for U.N. Ambassador? Don't laugh. Some in Washington are floating the idea [Politico].

  • Dictionary.com names "complicit" as the 2017 word of the year [Washington Post].

  • Consumers racked up $6.59 billion in online sales this year on "Cyber Monday" [USA Today].

  • Gun shoppers on Black Friday set a new record as the FBI ran more than 200,000 background checks, a single-day record [Time].

On this day in history:

  • 1520 - An expedition under the command of Ferdinand Magellan passes through the Strait of Magellan.

  • 1895 - The first American automobile race takes place over the 54 miles from Chicago's Jackson Park to Evanston, Illinois. Frank Duryea wins in approximately 10 hours.

  • 1919 - Virginia-born Nancy Astor became the first woman member of the British Parliament.

  • 1994 - Serial killer Jeffery Dahmer was beaten to death by another prisoner in Wisconsin.
  • Breaking! NBC News has fired Matt Lauer, the highest paid news anchor in the U.S., for inappropriate sexual behavior in the workplace [Axios].

  • A Senate panel approved the GOP tax reform plan on a straight party-line vote, which clears the way for the package to move to a vote in the full Senate [Washington Post].

  • A new national poll shows growing opposition toward the GOP tax reform plans, with 58% opposed to the package, which is up from 52% who were against the tax package last week [Politico].

  • The odds of a government shutdown are rising dramatically after Democratic leaders in Congress bailed on a meeting with President Trump after he sent out a tweet saying he did not "see a deal" on a spending bill [ABC News].

  • North Korea's latest ballistic missile test appears to show that country can now hit all of the continental U.S. [Washington Post].

  • A federal judge ruled in favor of the Trump administration in the fight over who is legally in charge of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau [ABC News].

  • Conservatives are growing increasingly frustrated with Attorney General Jeff Sessions's reluctance to open an investigation into Hillary Clinton [The Hill].

  • The Congressional Black Caucus is pressing Michigan Democrat John Conyers to retire following numerous allegations of sexual misconduct [Politico].

  • A new national poll shows Democrats are far more likely to believe allegations of sexual misconduct against public figures than do Republicans [Politico].

  • President Donald Trump is telling people he thinks the "Access Hollywood" tape, which captured him bragging about sexually assaulting women, is a fake [New York Times].

  • Boring but important: The Supreme Court is considering whether police must get a warrant to obtain cellphone data about the past locations of criminal suspects [Reuters].

  • A bipartisan group of lawmakers in Congress is pushing a bill to make "revenge porn" illegal [Politico].

  • CNN is boycotting the annual White House Christmas party due to President Trump's repeatedly calling the network "fake news" [Politico].

  • Bitcoin has doubled its value over the past three months. That rise has been fueled by traditional investors who are taking a new interest in the cryptocurrency [Recode].

  • Sen. Rand Paul says politics may have been a motivating factor why his neighbor attacked him earlier this month [Washington Times].

  • A new report says automation may wipe out 1/3 of America's workforce by the year 2030 [Axios].

  • Purchases made from mobile devices on Cyber Monday crossed the $2 billion mark this year [Recode].

On this day in history:

  • 1777 - San Jose, California, is founded as Pueblo de San Jose de Guadalupe by Jose Joaquin Moraga.

  • 1864 - Sand Creek massacre: Colorado volunteers led by Colonel John Chivington massacre at least 150 Cheyenne and Arapaho tribe members.

  • 1877 - Thomas Edison demonstrates his phonograph for the first time.

  • 1929 - Admiral Richard Byrd leads the first expedition to fly over the South Pole.

  • 1963 - President Lyndon B. Johnson establishes the Warren Commission to investigate the assassination of President John F. Kennedy.
  • If the Senate GOP can pass their tax reform package by the end of this week, then they may be able to get a tax bill to President Donald Trump's desk by the end of 2017. If not, then the bill could slip into next year [Politico].

  • The non-partisan Congressional Budget Office says the Senate GOP tax plan would give big tax breaks to Americans making more than $100,000 a year and add $1.4 trillion to the deficit over the next ten years. Those earning less than $100,000 per year would be worse off [Washington Post].

  • The government will run out of money on December 8 unless Congress can pass a new spending measure. Congressional leaders are exploring the idea of adopting a short-term funding package to push the deadline back until late December [Washington Post].

  • What's next for President Trump if Congress can pass tax reform? Nobody seems to know [Politico].

  • Nearly a dozen states, including Utah, are bracing for the Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP) to run out of money. Five states will run out of funding by the end of the year. Congress seems to be in no hurry to reauthorize the popular program [The Hill].

  • Congress is bracing for more sexual harassment allegations to come to light [New York Times].

  • Congressional Democrats are in a tough spot with the revelations about the claims of sexual harassment against Michigan Rep. John Conyers. Conyers has stepped down as the ranking member of the Judiciary Committee [Politico].

  • Now four women have said they were groped or sexually harassed by Democratic Sen. Al Franken. Franken says he is ashamed but has no plans to step down from office [Minneapolis Star-Tribune].

  • It sure as heck looks like Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders is readying to run for president in 2020 [Politico].

  • Time is running out for Congress to take steps to secure the nation's voting systems from hackers ahead of the 2018 midterm elections [Politico].

  • The current acting director of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau has filed suit to prevent President Donald Trump from appointing current White House budget director Mick Mulvaney to temporarily head the agency [Washington Post].

  • Melania Trump really, really, really did not want to become First Lady [Vanity Fair].

  • George H.W. Bush is now the longest-living U.S. President in history [Time].

  • It's Cyber Monday. Here are some of this year's best deals for online shoppers [CNN].

On this day in history:

  • 1973 - The U.S. Senate votes 92-3 to confirm Gerald Ford as Vice President.

  • 1978 - In San Francisco Mayor Geoge Moscone and openly gay city supervisor Harvey Milk are assassinated by former supervisor Dan White.