Briefing National

  • The Russian government sent more than 60 money transfers to embassies around the world with an accompanying note that said: "to finance election campaign of 2016" [BuzzFeed].

  • The revised GOP tax reform plan from the Senate now includes repealing the Affordable Care Act's requirement that most Americans have health insurance. Many tax cuts for individuals would also expire in 2025 [New York Times]. 

  • Attorney General Jeff Sessions changes his story about contacts with Russia during the 2016 campaign again but denies that he lied about those contacts during two previous hearings before Congress [New York Times].

  • Poll: Former Vice President Joe Biden leads President Donald Trump 46-35% in a hypothetical 2020 election matchup [Politico].

  • The announcement that Attorney General Jeff Sessions may appoint another special counsel to investigate the Clinton Foundation has longtime staffers worrying he is politicizing the Justice Department [Washington Post].

  • The jury in the corruption trial of Democratic Sen. Robert Menendez still has not reached a verdict [Politico].

  • Republicans are hoping President Donald Trump will help them salvage the Roy Moore situation [The Hill].

  • Moore says he's being "harassed" by the media over sexual allegations against him [CNN].

  • Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell predicts that Moore could be expelled if he wins next month's election [Politico].

  • Former White House strategist Steve Bannon is reportedly having second thoughts about backing Roy Moore's campaign in Alabama [Daily Beast].

  • China is sending an envoy to North Korea following President Trump's visit [Associated Press].

  • A gunman in Northern California killed ten people at several locations before he was shot dead by law enforcement [New York Times].

  • The United States gave a $2.8 million no-bid contract to a company founded by a former KGB leader to provide security for the American embassy in Moscow [New York Times].

  • There's been an apparent coup in Zimbabwe. The military says they've taken custody of President Robert Mugabe [New York Times].

On this day in history:

  • 1533 - Francisco Pizarro arrives in Cuzco, the capital of the Inca Empire.

  • 1777 - After 16 months of debate the Continental Congress approves the Articles of Confederation.

  • 1864 - Civil War: Union General William Tecumseh Sherman begins Sherman's March to the Sea.

  • 1939 - President Franklin D. Roosevelt lays the cornerstone of the Jefferson Memorial.

  • 1969 - More than 500,000 people demonstrated in Washington against the Vietnam War.
  • The Justice Department is looking into whether to appoint a special counsel to probe the Clinton Foundation and a 2010 decision by the Obama administration to allow a Russian group to buy a company that owned access to uranium in the U.S. [New York Times].

  • Woah! Donald Trump Jr. was in contact with Wikileaks at the time the website was publicly releasing emails Russian hackers stole from the Clinton campaign. Most of the messages from Wikileaks went unanswered by Trump Jr., but he did make other top officials in the Trump campaign aware of the communications [Atlantic].

  • The latest Roy Moore news:

    • A fifth woman has come forward alleging that Moore sexually assaulted her when she was a teenager and Moore was in his 30's [New York Times].

    • More Senate Republicans call on Moore to leave the race, including Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell [Washington Post].

    • Some Senate Republicans are threatening to expel Moore if he wins December's election. The Senate has not expelled a member in more than 150 years [Politico].

    • Despite the Republican National Committee ending a joint fundraising agreement with Moore, there are still several paid Republican staffers on the ground in Alabama helping out with Moore's campaign [BuzzFeed].

    • Moore was allegedly banned from a local mall in Alabama because of his habit of hitting on teenage girls there [New Yorker].

  • It wasn't just Russia! Governments in 30 countries spread disinformation online to quell unrest or influence elections [Recode].

  • Whoops! A Trump judicial nominee failed to disclose he's married to a White House lawyer on a list of family members who might present a conflict of interest [New York Times].

  • President Donald Trump taps Alex Azar, a former executive with pharmaceutical company Eli Lilly, as the new Secretary of Health and Human Services [New York Times].

  • The number of hate crimes in the U.S. rose for the second straight year [Associated Press].

On this day in history:

  • 1666 - The first blood transfusion took place in London. Blood from one dog was transfused into another.

  • 1899 - Pioneering female journalist Nellie Bly (aka Elizabeth Cochrane) begins a successful attempt to travel around the world in less than 80 days. She completed the trip in 72 days.

  • 1969 - NASA launches Apollo 12, the second manned mission to the surface of the Moon.

  • 1986 - The White House acknowledged the CIA's role in secretly shipping weapons to Iran.

  • 1995 - A budget standoff in Congress forces the federal government to temporarily close national parks and museums and to run most government offices with skeleton staffs.
  • ROMNEY WATCH: Mitt Romney has been meeting with Utah power brokers and political donors as he's getting closer to launching a run for U.S. Senate next year [Politico].

  • BOMBSHELL! A woman says Alabama GOP Senate nominee Roy Moore initiated a sexual encounter with her when she was 14 and he was 32. Two other women say Moore pursued them when they were 16 and 18 years-old around the same time. Moore has denied the allegations [Washington Post]. 

    • Some Republicans are calling for Moore to drop out of the U.S. Senate race because of the allegations, but some absentee ballots have already been sent to voters, so there are no options for replacing him on the ballot [Washington Post]. Moore's campaign sent out a fundraising email in response to the allegations [Politico].

    • Former White House strategist Steve Bannon compared the allegations against Moore to the release of the "Access Hollywood" tapes just before the 2016 election [CBS News].

  • The U.S. Senate takes the wraps off their tax reform proposal. The Senate version puts a one-year delay for cutting the corporate tax rate. It also keeps some middle-class tax breaks that were left out of the House version [New York Times].

  • President Trump talks trade in Vietnam on the latest leg of his visit to Asia. Trump did not meet with Russian President Vladimir Putin during the visit because of scheduling conflicts [Washington Post].

  • Keith Schiller, President Trump's longtime bodyguard, told investigators probing Russia's involvement in the 2016 election that a Russian once offered to "send five women" to Trump's hotel room in Moscow after a business meeting. Schiller says Trump declined the offer [NBC News].

  • The research firm that prepared a dossier on President Trump's alleged ties to Russia offered the Trump campaign unrelated information on donors to the Clinton Foundation [Reuters].

  • Special counsel Robert Meuller has interviewed White House senior policy adviser Stephen Miller as part of the probe into Russia's involvement in the 2016 election [CNN].

  • The bribery trial of Democratic Senator Robert Menendez could end in a deadlocked jury. A former juror who had to leave the trial said she would have found Menendez not guilty [Politico].

  • The U.S. Air Force missed at least two chances to prevent the man who killed 26 people at a Texas church on Sunday from buying guns [Reuters].

On this day in history:

  • 1775 - The United States Marine Corps, then known as the Continental Marines,  is founded at Tun Tavern in Philadelphia by Samuel Nicholas.

  • 1871 - Journalist Henry Stanley found Scottish missionary David Livingstone in a small African village. His famous comment: "Dr. Livingstone, I presume."

  • 1898 - Beginning of the Wilmington insurrection of 1898, the only instance of a municipal government being overthrown in United States history.

  • 1969 - National Educational Television (the predecessor to the Public Broadcasting Service) debuts Sesame Street.

  • 1975 - The freighter S.S. Edmund Fitzgerald sinks during a storm on Lake Superior, killing all 29 crew on board.

  • 1989 - Germans begin to tear down the Berlin Wall
  • Republicans in Congress say they're confident the tax reform package will pass the House later this week [Politico].

  • President Donald Trump got loose on Twitter on Sunday attacking those who are investigating his campaign's alleged ties to Russia as "haters and fools." He also called North Korea's leader Kim Jong-un "short and fat" [New York Times].

  • A powerful 7.3 magnitude earthquake on the Iran-Iraq border has killed more than 300 people [Associated Press].

  • President Donald Trump says he will make a "major" announcement on trade this week after he returns to the U.S. from his trip to Asia [Politico].

  • Alabama Senate candidate Roy Moore is trying to get his campaign back on track following a blockbuster report that he initiated an inappropriate relationship with a 14-year-old girl in the 1970's [Washington Post]. Moore has promised to sue the Washington Post for publishing the report [Associated Press].

  • President Donald Trump now says he believes the conclusions from U.S. intelligence agencies that Russia meddled in the 2016 presidential election. He also says he believes Russian President Vladimir Putin is sincere when he denied that Russia interfered in the election [ABC News].

  • Despite big wins in last week's elections, Democrats should probably temper their enthusiasm about next year's midterm elections. Partisan gerrymandering will likely minimize any gains they make in 2018 [New York Times].

  • Former Vice President Joe Biden is still playing coy about whether he'll run for president in 2020, saying he's not sure it's an appropriate thing for him to do [Yahoo].

  • A 12-year-old Colorado girl is suing Attorney General Jeff Sessions and the Drug Enforcement Agency seeking to legalize medical marijuana nationwide. The girl suffers from epilepsy and uses cannabis to alleviate her condition [ABC News].

  • The Army has lifted a ban on recruits who have a history of some mental disorders, including bipolar disorder and depression [USA Today].

On this day in history:

  • 1002 - English king Ã†thelred II orders the killing of all Danes in England, known today as the St. Brice's Day massacre.

  • 1927 - The Holland Tunnel opens to traffic as the first Hudson River vehicle tunnel linking New Jersey to New York City.

  • 1956 - The Supreme Court declares Alabama laws requiring segregated buses illegal.

  • 1982 - The Vietnam Veterans Memorial is dedicated in Washington, D.C.
  • The GOP is worried that Tuesday's election losses may portend bigger problems for them in 2018 [Washington Post].

  • Republicans in Congress say the drubbing they took at the polls on Tuesday night puts extra pressure on them to pass tax reform [Politico].

  • Senate Republicans will unveil their tax reform proposal on Thursday. Their plan would eliminate the ability to deduct state and local taxes, but will not completely get rid of the estate tax [New York Times].

  • Former national security adviser Michael Flynn is reportedly worried his son, Michael Flynn Jr., could be legally vulnerable in the investigation into how Russia interfered in the 2016 election [CNN].

  • President Trump said Thursday he's confident China can help defuse the growing crisis with North Korea [New York Times].

  • Lawmakers are alarmed that President Donald Trump's Justice Department is allegedly intervening in the proposed merger between AT&T and Time Warner. Sources say the DOJ is demanding that the two companies sell off Turner Broadcasting, including CNN, or the deal will not go through [Politico].

  • What the heck is going on with the Rand Paul assault story? His neighbors are saying the attack on Paul by a neighbor was not motivated by a landscaping dispute, but rather it was political [Washington Examiner, Breitbart].

  • An employee of an anti-hunger nonprofit founded by members of the House embezzled more than $1 million, then disappeared [Politico].

  • Video captured the attack on a Texas church where a gunman methodically slaughtered 26 people on Sunday [New York Times].

  • Experts say this year's flu vaccine may not protect everyone from the bug, but you should get one anyway [CNN].

On this day in history:

  • 1620 - Pilgrims aboard the Mayflower sight land at Cape Cod, Massachusetts.

  • 1872 - A fire which began in the basement of a warehouse in downtown Boston raged for 12 hours, consuming 65 acres and destroying 776 buildings. At least 30 people were killed.

  • 1906 - President Theodore Roosevelt is the first sitting president to make an official trip outside the United States to inspect progress on the Panama Canal.

  • 1938 - Mobs of Germans attacked Jewish businesses and homes throughout Germany in what became known as Kristallnacht, or Crystal Night.

  • 1979 - NORAD computers detected a purported massive Soviet nuclear strike. After reviewing the raw data from satellites and early-warning radars, the alert was canceled.

  • 1989 - East Germany opens checkpoints in the Berlin Wall, allowing its citizens to travel to West Berlin.