Briefing National

  • Terror in New York. A man plowed a pickup truck down a bike path in Manhattan, killing eight people and wounding 11. The driver, who came to the U.S. from Uzbekistan, shouted "Allahu akbar" after exiting the vehicle [New York Times].

  • President Donald Trump says George Papadopoulos, who pleaded guilty this week to lying to federal agents investigating Russia's involvement in the 2016 election, was a "low-level volunteer" in the Trump campaign. However, documents show Papadopoulos was in regular contact with the most senior officials in the Trump campaign [Washington Post].

  • Papadopoulos claimed in an email that top Trump campaign officials agreed to a pre-election meeting with representatives of Russian President Vladimir Putin [Bloomberg].

  • Court documents show former Trump campaign head Paul Manafort holds three passports, each under a separate number, and has traveled to other countries using a phone and email account registered under a fake name [ABC News].

  • President Donald Trump is getting increasing pressure from his political advisers to aggressively push back against special counsel Robert Muller's investigation [Washington Post].

  • Top staffers from tech giants Google, Facebook, and Twitter testified before Congress on Tuesday. Here's what they said [Axios].

  • Thousands of people attended a protest in New York City against President Donald Trump organized by Russian operatives on Facebook [The Hill].

  • Employees of Fox News are reportedly embarrassed about how their network is covering the growing Russia scandal [CNN Money].

  • Despite President Trump's assertion that diplomacy with North Korea is a waste of time, the U.S. is pursuing direct talks with Kim Jong Un's regime [Reuters].
  • House Republicans are postponing the rollout of their tax reform proposal to iron out some last-minute disagreements [Politico].

  • The GOP reportedly will propose keeping the tax rate for top earners at 39.6% instead of dropping it to 35% in a bid to get moderates to support the proposal [Washington Post].

  • NPR's top editor has been placed on leave after two women allege he made unwanted physical contact with them when he was with another news organization [Washington Post].

On this day in history:

  • 1512 - The ceiling of the Sistine Chapel, painted by Michelangelo, is exhibited to the public for the first time.

  • 1520 - The Strait of Magellan is first discovered and navigated by European explorer Ferdinand Magellan.

  • 1604 - William Shakespeare's tragedy Othello is performed for the first time at Whitehall Palace in London.

  • 1611 - William Shakespeare's play The Tempest is performed for the first time.

  • 1765 - The British Parliament enacts the Stamp Act on the Thirteen Colonies to help pay for British military operations in North America.

  • 1800 - John Adams becomes the first president to live in the White House.

  • 1938 - Seabiscuit beat War Admiral in horse racing's "match of the century."

  • 1950 - Two Puerto Rican nationalists tried to force their way into the Blair House in Washington in an attempt to assassinate President Harry Truman.
  • Where could special counsel Robert Mueller be headed next following his indictments against former Trump campaign officials? [Politico].

  • Former White House strategist Steve Bannon is urging Trump to fight back against Mueller, pushing him to defund the investigation as a way to get rid of Mueller without actually firing him [Politico].

  • A 30-year-old low-level foreign policy adviser to Donald Trump pleaded guilty to lying to prosecutors about trying to set up meetings with Russian operatives who had alerted the campaign that they were in possession of hacked emails from Hillary Clinton. Those meetings never took place, however [New York Times].

  • President Donald Trump fumed while he watched the coverage of Monday's bombshell indictments in the Russia investigation [Washington Post].

  • Here's a timeline of President Donald Trump's involvement in Russia, reaching back to 2013 [Politico].

  • Facebook says as many as 126 million people saw content from Russia-linked pages during the 2016 election [CNN Money].

  • Arizona Republican Senator Jeff Flake, who announced he would not seek the GOP nomination in 2018, is now mulling an independent Senate bid next year [U.S. News].

On this day in history:

  • 1517 - Martin Luther posts his 95 Theses on the door of the Castle Church in Wittenberg.

  • 1864 - Nevada is admitted as the 36th state.

  • 1941 - After 14 years of work, Mount Rushmore is completed.

  • 1968 - Vietnam War October surprise: Citing progress with the Paris peace talks, President Lyndon B. Johnson announces he has ordered a complete cessation of "all air, naval, and artillery bombardment of North Vietnam" effective November 1.
  • The House narrowly passed a budget blueprint that will allow Republicans to move forward on tax reform [New York Times].

  • Republicans in the House and Senate are hoping to pass tax reform legislation by Thanksgiving, which gives them just 22 working days to accomplish that Herculean task [Washington Post].

  • President Donald Trump declares the opioid crisis a national health emergency but stops short of allocating any funds to fight the epidemic [New York Times].

  • Republicans in Congress are aiming to hamper special counsel Robert Muller's probe into Russian interference in the 2016 election by limiting his budget [Politico].

  • Congressional Republicans are winding down their investigations into Russian involvement in last year's election without addressing allegations of collusion with the Trump campaign [Politico].

  • John PodestaHillary Clinton's campaign manager, and former DNC chairwoman Debbie Wasserman Schultz told congressional Russian investigators they did not have any knowledge about an arrangement to fund opposition research on Donald Trump which resulted in a salacious dossier alleging ties between the Trump campaign and Russia [CNN].

  • The Trump administration releases most of the remaining JFK assassination files, but some are still being withheld because of national security concerns [ABC News]. Some of the wildest information contained in the newly public files show Cuban exiles tried to put a bounty on Fidel Castro's head, a probe into alleged sex parties held by JFK and prominent Hollywood actors and the effort to find a stripper named "Kitty" [Washington Post].

  • Democratic Congresswoman Frederica Wilson says she is getting threats because she criticized President Donald Trump's remarks made to the widow of a soldier killed in Niger [ABC News].

  • Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell is setting up a voting blitz to confirm several of Donald Trump's judicial nominees [Politico].

  • This is fishy. A computer server that is part of a lawsuit against Georgia election officials was wiped shortly after the suit was filed. The lawsuit targeted the server which was known to have a gaping security hole, and the plaintiffs are hoping to force Georgia to upgrade their antiquated election system [Associated Press].

  • More women step forward to level sexual harassment allegations against journalist Mark Halperin [Washington Post].

  • The National Weather Service is "teetering on the brink of failure" because they don't have enough staff to accomplish their mission [Washington Post].

On this day in history:

  • 1787 - A New York newspaper published the first of 77 essays explaining the new Constitution and urging its ratification. The essays were written by Alexander Hamilton, James Madison and John Jay, and later combined as "The Federalist Papers."

  • 1838 - Missouri governor Lilburn Boggs issues the Extermination Order, which orders all Mormons to leave the state or be exterminated.

  • 1904 - The first underground New York City Subway line opens.

  • 1964 - Ronald Reagan delivers a speech on behalf of Republican candidate for president, Barry Goldwater. The speech launches his political career and comes to be known as "A Time for Choosing."

  • 1988 - President Ronald Reagan suspends construction of the new U.S. Embassy in Moscow due to Soviet listening devices in the building structure.
  • Boom goes the dynamite! Former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort have been told to surrender to federal authorities as part of special counsel Robert Mueller's probe into Russian involvement in the 2016 election [New York Times].

  • Here's how to game out what might happen from the charges stemming from Mueller's investigation [Wired].

  • Republicans are desperate to change the focus away from the Russia investigation, so they're turning to a familiar boogeyman, Hillary Clinton [New York Times].

  • Former intelligence chief James Clapper says Russia "succeeded beyond their wildest expectations" in meddling with the 2016 election, and he warns they're going to do it again [Politico].

  • Republicans are already facing a setback on tax reform as a powerful industry lobby is already opposing the plan before it is made public [Washington Post].

  • Authorities in Puerto Rico are canceling a sketchy contract to rebuild the country's electric infrastructure that was given to a small Montana company [Washington Post].

  • Iranian President Hassan Rouhani turned down a request to meet with President Donald Trump following his speech at the United Nations in September [Bloomberg].

  • Groups that run afoul of the FEC are simply not paying the fines that are levied against them [Politico].

  • Facebook is taking a stronger stance on identifying who paid for political ads ahead of their appearance before Congress this week to answer questions about Russian meddling in the 2016 election [Recode].

  • The Navy is investigating whether two members of SEAL Team Six killed an Army Green Beret in Mali over the summer [ABC News].

  • Twitter permanently booted Trump supporter Roger Stone for a profanity-laced tirade against CNN's Don Lemon [Recode].

On this day in history:

  • 1831 - Escaped slave Nat Turner is captured and arrested for leading the bloodiest slave rebellion in U.S. history.

  • 1864 - Helena, Montana is founded after prospectors discover gold at "Last Chance Gulch."

  • 1938 - Orson Welles broadcasts his radio play of H.G. Wells's "The War of the Worlds."

  • 1941 - President Franklin D. Roosevelt approves $1 billion in Lend-Lease aid to the Allied nations.

  • 1944 - Anne and Margot Frank are deported from Auschwitz to the Bergen-Belsen concentration camp, where they die from disease the following year.

  • 1974 - The "Rumble in the Jungle" boxing match between Muhammad Ali and George Forman takes place in Kinshasha, Zaire.
  • Cambridge Analytica, the data firm used by the Trump campaign during the 2016 campaign, contacted WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange seeking access to thousands of Hillary Clinton's emails kept on a private server while she was secretary of state [CNN].

  • As Congressional Republicans push forward with their tax reform plan, but there are six issues that could derail that effort [Politico].

  • A group of Republicans are threatening to derail the tax reform effort if a plan to get rid of the state and local tax deduction is included [CNN].

  • Republicans shouldn't expect any help from Democrats on tax reform. House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi says if the GOP crashes and burns on this issue, it will likely flip the house to Democratic control [Politico].

  • Former Vice President Joe Biden says he's not ruling out a run for president in 2020 [ABC News].

  • President Donald Trump will declare the opioid crisis as a public health crisis on Thursday but will stop short of declaring it a national emergency [USA Today].

  • Retiring Sen. Jeff Flake says he won't be "vindictive" toward President Trump's agenda in Congress, even though the two men have serious differences [Politico].

  • President Donald Trump lashes out at Flake on Twitter following his announcement that he won't run again in 2018 [ABC News].

  • A record number of Americans support legalizing marijuana in the U.S., including a majority of Republicans [Gallup].

  • President Donald Trump is changing the GOP and his critics have two choices - either give in or give up  [New York Times].

  • Allies of Sen. Mitch McConnell are starting to openly attack former White House strategist Steve Bannon. Bannon is hoping to oust McConnell as Senate Majority Leader in 2018 [Washington Post].

  • The final batch of secret documents from the assassination of President John F. Kennedy will be released on Thursday [New York Times].

  • Fishy! in 2014 President Donald Trump's longtime business associate Michael Cohen sold four New York buildings to anonymous buyers for millions of dollars in cash. Experts say the transactions raise red flags because they could be part of a money-laundering scheme [McClatchy].

  • Former Fox News host Bill O'Reilly is in negotiations with Sinclair Broadcasting to host a new show. Sinclair owns nearly 200 TV stations across the country [NBC News].

  • Five women have accused prominent journalist Mark Halperin of sexual harassment [CNN].

  • Ready to give Amazon.com the ability to open your front door while you're not home? [Recode]

  • A record number of retail stores have closed during 2017 [CNN Money].

On this day in history:

  • 1774 -The first Continental Congress adjourns in Philadelphia.

  • 1775 - King George III of Great Britain goes before Parliament to declare the American colonies in rebellion, and authorizes a military response.

  • 1776 - Benjamin Franklin departs America for France on a mission to seek French support for the American Revolution.

  • 1825 - The Erie Canal, America's first man-made waterway, was opened, linking the Great Lakes and the Atlantic Ocean via the Hudson River.

  • 1861 - The Pony Express officially ceases operations.

  • 1881 - The Gunfight at the O.K. Corral takes place at Tombstone, Arizona.

  • 1936 - The first electric generator at Hoover Dam goes into full operation.

  • 2001 - Congress passes the USA PATRIOT Act into law.