Salt Lake City Hall

 

Our “Political Insiders” and readers think Sen. Luz Escamilla and former Sen. Jim Dabakis have the best chance of finishing in the top-two of the August Salt Lake City mayoral primary election and advancing to the November election.

So far, there are nine candidates vying to replace outgoing Mayor Jackie Biskupski, who announced earlier this year she would not seek a second term heading up Utah’s capitol city.

We asked our panel of “Political Insiders” and readers to predict the finishing order for the August primary election. Escamilla was picked as the frontrunner across all three groups and Dabakis was second. After that, opinions vary.

David Garbett was the 3rd choice among Republicans and our readers, while Democrats picked David Ibarra 3rd. Ibarra came in 4th among the Republicans on our panel and our readers.

You can see the full results below.

 

Republican insiders

Democratic insiders

UtahPolicy.com readers

Luz Escamilla

1st

1st

1st

Jim Dabakis

2nd

2nd

2nd

David Garbett

3rd

5th

3rd

David Ibarra

4th

3rd

4th

Erin Mendenhall

5th

4th

5th

Richard Goldberger

6th

8th

7th

Christian Harrison

7th

7th

8th

Stan Penfold

8th

6th

6th

Aaron Johnson

9th

9th

9th

 

These numbers are similar to our April straw poll when Luz Escamilla was picked as the frontrunner in the race, while Jim Dabakis and Erin Mendenhall were picked second.

The contest is easily on track to become the most expensive in the city’s history. Several candidates have already raised more than $100,000.

Editor’s note:

After the publication of our April straw poll on the race, Jim Dabakis accused, without proof, that UtahPolicy.com was trying to manipulate public opinion in favor of other candidates.

For reference, Wikipedia defines a straw poll as an “ad-hoc or unofficial vote.” Straw polls “provide important interactive dialogue among movements within large groups, reflecting trends like organization and motivation.”

“Opinion polls are generally conducted with statistical selection controls in place and are thus called ‘scientific,’ while straw polls are conducted among self-selected populations and are called ‘unscientific.’”

The results of our straw poll are not scientific or predictive and are not presented as such.