Romney celebrates 30th anniversary of Central Utah Project Completion Act

Helped secure $50 million in funding in Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act to accelerate key water resource projects

U.S. Senator Romney (R-UT) released the following statement on the 30th anniversary of the Central Utah Project Completion Act (CUPCA), the state of Utah’s largest and most comprehensive federal water resource development project. During negotiations of the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act, Senator Romney helped secure $50 million in funding for CUPCA to accelerate key water resource projects, which will provide water for municipal use, mitigation, hydroelectric power, fish and wildlife, and conservation.

“The Central Utah Water Project is a critical piece of infrastructure that ensures Utahns along the Wasatch Front get the water that they so desperately need,” Senator Romney said. “It’s been 30 years since the passage of the Central Utah Project Completion Act and I’m grateful for all of those along the way who have fought to ensure this project remains funded and successful. I was proud to continue those efforts by fighting for the inclusion of $50 million in additional funding for CUPCA in the bipartisan infrastructure bill. It remains essential that we continue to use our water resources in a way that’s appropriate and responsible, and projects like CUPCA will help our state maintain the vitality and quality of life that Utahns have long-enjoyed for many generations to come.”

Background:

Negotiated by Senator Romney and his colleagues, the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act is a once-in-a-generation investment which will address decades of neglect of our nation’s hard, physical infrastructure. Senator Romney helped secure $50 million for Central Utah Project Completion Act, which will provide water for municipal use, mitigation, hydroelectric power, fish and wildlife, and conservation.

The Central Utah Project moves water from the Colorado River Basin in eastern Utah to the western slopes of the Wasatch Mountain range, where the state has seen a rapid growth in population. It provides water for municipal and industrial use, irrigation, hydroelectric power, fish and wildlife, conservation and recreation.

The Central Utah Project was authorized in 1956 under the Colorado River Storage Project Act, and CUPCA was enacted by Congress in 1992. CUPCA authorized additional funding for the project and transferred responsibility for planning, designing and constructing the remaining Central Utah Project features to the Central Utah Water Conservancy District.

Details on how the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act will benefit Utah can be found here.