Wisconsin Democrat Allegedly Plagiarizes Corroon’s Platform

Mary Burke, the Democratic nominee for governor in Wisconsin, has been accused of plagiarizing a number of sources for her campaign platform and policy proposals. Now, add Utah Democratic Party Chair to the list of those she's apparently stolen from.

BuzzFeed found that Burke appears to have lifted language from Corroon's 2010 run for governor for her jobs plan.

Here’s 2010 Utah Peter Corroon’s plan for jobs:

Foster next-generation career and technical education (CTE) programs by supporting the Office of Career and Technical Education’s Career Clusters Initiative. This initiative will ensure that students across the state are offered the opportunity to begin training in high school for a high-wage “clean tech” career by taking a series of progressively more advanced courses in a particular area, such as electronics, computer programming, allied health care, or engineering. Career Pathways programs blend academic science, technology, engineering, and math coursework with cutting-edge vocational training to give students the knowledge and the background to be able to compete in the new economy; students would complete the regular high school curriculum, but they would also have the opportunity to take specialized college courses in their career path or professional discipline.

Here’s Burke:

This initiative, offered through the Wisconsin Technical College System, in a partnership with the Department of Workforce Development called RISE (Regional Industrial Skills Education),31 enables Wisconsin high school students to begin training for a high-wage, high growth career before they graduate from high school by taking a series of progressively more advanced courses in a particular area – like electronics, computer programming, allied health or engineering. Career Pathways programs blend academic science, technology, engineering and math coursework with cutting-edge vocational training to give students both the knowledge and the know-how to compete in the new economy.32Students complete the regular high school curriculum, but they also have the opportunity to take specialized college courses in their “career path” or professional discipline, creating a seamless pathway from high school to a credential or further education.